The Tweet Pitch

Inspired by the 140 character limit imposed by Twitter, one of the consultants on the Echo Communications team (Kevin Morrison) came up with the idea for the ‘Tweet Pitch’ (not to be confused with Stowe Boyd‘s #Twitpitch for Twitter).

Here’s the idea: While our typical pitch abstracts run about 350 – 400 words (we use these abstracts to back up the top level story ideas we send to media, bloggers, etc.), Kevin’s idea was to start using pitches that are really short by traditional media relations standards.  For example, two of his most successful pitches were only 90 words long. He was even complimented by a journalist for a well written, well thought-out pitch.  Given that we need to be smart about what we say in each tweet because of the 140-character limit, why not apply the same approach to pitches?

This article written by Amy Jacques for PR Tactics and The Strategist Online (a PRSA publication) focuses on how to make the most out of 140 characters. I think there’s absolutely no reason why we can’t apply some of those guidelines to the pitches we send by email to media.  I imagine this is an approach that would be especially well received by the blogging community.

I’m interested to know if others are already using Tweet pitching as a strategy, and if the results they’ve seen are better than with the traditional abstract. And if you’re not already Tweet pitching, I challenge you to give it a try.

~ Jodi Echakowitz (Twitter: JodiEchakowitz)

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One response to “The Tweet Pitch

  1. We’ve been in development for a while on the concept. Check out Tweet Pitch

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